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2021 popular The Rise high quality of the Roman outlet sale Empire (Penguin Classics) sale

2021 popular The Rise high quality of the Roman outlet sale Empire (Penguin Classics) sale
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The Greek statesman Polybius (c.200–118 BC) wrote his account of the relentless growth of the Roman Empire in order to help his fellow countrymen understand how their world came to be dominated by Rome. Opening with the Punic War in 264 BC, he vividly records the critical stages of Roman expansion: its campaigns throughout the Mediterranean, the temporary setbacks inflicted by Hannibal and the final destruction of Carthage. An active participant of the politics of his time as well as a friend of many prominent Roman citizens, Polybius drew on many eyewitness accounts in writing this cornerstone work of history.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

About the Author

Polybius (200-118 BC) was a Greek statesman and historian.

F.W. Walbank has published numerous works on ancient Greece.

Ian Scott-Kilvert has also translated Plutarch''s works for Penguin Classics.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
124 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Sesho
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
WHERE''S THE THIRD PUNIC WAR?
Reviewed in the United States on April 12, 2020
We live in an era when journalism is truly dead. Nobody is interested in causes or patterns or the truth. Nobody is interested in investigating or consulting sources. Lots of new stories are done based only on tweets or hearsay or rumors. Nobody has the time to check or... See more
We live in an era when journalism is truly dead. Nobody is interested in causes or patterns or the truth. Nobody is interested in investigating or consulting sources. Lots of new stories are done based only on tweets or hearsay or rumors. Nobody has the time to check or verify anything. It''s just constantly flowing information, with no differentiation between lies and facts. And the internet is infinite so there''s no reason to condense or weed out the trivial. EVERYTHING is important.

We also live in an era where America and its ideals are waning and running out of energy. Its decadence and decay are apparent everywhere you look. The American flag is seen as a symbol of freedom no longer but of facism. People are shamed or even ATTACKED for showing pride in their country. I''m just glad I''m old enough that I won''t have to see its true end. Only the beginnings of that end.

To me, the author of this book, Polybius (c.200-118BC) was what journalists USED to be like in America. He was very interested in getting the facts right. He tried to be as objective as he could be without letting his personal prejudices influence what he was writing about. He wanted to educate people about the world. He thought he was doing something important. He visited the places he wrote about instead of sitting in his office surfing the net. He was involved in the wars and politics of his day. He interviewed and knew people involved in the historical events he was depicting. Everything he was doing 2000 years ago is what the media should be doing now.

The main theme of The Rise of the Roman Empire was for Polybius to tell the world how Rome, an undistinguished city at the time, came to conquer what was then the known world. How it became the superpower of its time. He also wanted to document events to educate generations in hopes that they would find wisdom and inspiration to do the right thing at the right time through noting the actions of the leaders of Rome and Carthage.

Rome''s rise is depicted mainly through the prism of the Punic Wars, a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage and their allies. The book begins with the origins of the first war and ends with the destruction of Carthage in the third. Along the way Polybius also informs us what was going on simultaneously in other parts of the Mediterranean, such as Egypt and Greece. Polybius strays from the Punic Wars because he saw this era as a time when the Mediterranean was an organic whole with each part having influence on each other through war and trade.

What I loved about this book is that Polybius was alive during parts of the history and was personally involved in the Punic Wars because he was really good friends with Scipio, one of the greatest Roman generals of all time. He was given access to people, sources, and lands to do his research.

I think Polybius''s original work was about 40 volumes. This is merely a selection of the existing books. A complaint I have is what the editors or translator chose to include in The Rise of the Roman Empire. Scott-Kilvert does a really good job with the 1st and 2nd Punic Wars, but there is only about ONE PAGE covering the 3rd. I have no clue as to what happened to make the Romans totally destroy Carthage or even who was involved or what led up to it. But yet the translator wastes a lot of pages including events in Greece, Egypt, and even a long section about Polybius evening scores with a fellow history writer. I''m going to have to read another work or book to find out what went on in the Third Punic War. Very unfortunate choice of what to include and not include in this book.

Something else I liked about Polybius is that he knew he was writing about Rome in its prime. He believed that all governments descend into destruction on a long enough timeline. He was aware that he was living in Rome''s Golden Age, before the decadence and insanity of it becoming an empire. Scipio was the opposite of Ceasar. He was not in the Punic Wars to crown himself king or emperor. He was serving Rome and always remembered it was a privelage to serve his city. He could very easily have seized power and done whatever he wanted. But at the conclusion of the wars, he quietly retired. Carthage too was in its prime. Everything and everyone needs a competitor to bring out the best in each other. So it was very interesting to see these two powers playing chess games through war and diplomacy.

To me, Polybius acheived his goals. I understood how Rome became the superpower of its time. And I also gained a lot of wisdom and insights into my OWN time and place. I think after World War 2 we were like Rome at the conclusion of the Punic Wars. The world was its oyster for a time. But as soon as we didn''t have a true toe to toe enemy with the collapse of Russia, the spiritual and material decay began to set in. Maybe China is our rival now but we owe them so much money and are so economically dependent on their manufacturing, we are more their slave than anything else.
10 people found this helpful
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R. Ahmed
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unfortunately doesn''t contain everything
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2017
Although the translation in this edition is excellent and easy to read, the translator has cut out some major parts of the original. For example in the first book of Histories, missing here is the account of the mercenary revolt that took place after Carthage lost the... See more
Although the translation in this edition is excellent and easy to read, the translator has cut out some major parts of the original. For example in the first book of Histories, missing here is the account of the mercenary revolt that took place after Carthage lost the first Punic War. This is pretty jarring because in Book 2, Polybius begins by summarizing what he covered in Book 1. I had to flip back to make sure I wasn''t forgetting reading this episode, but as the author says in his introduction, he has left parts of the original out in order to fit it into one volume.

If you are just casually reading this, then I suppose it''s not such a big deal. However if you want to read all of what Polybius wrote (and that has survived), then don''t buy this.
11 people found this helpful
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N. Ben-horin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A masterpiece, and a great lesson on ife
Reviewed in the United States on March 28, 2020
I ordered this book ten years ago, and decided to read it again. For a reason. It''s a fascinating account of the evolution of the roman empire and its expansion from the Italian peninsual to the rest of the known world in less then fifty years. The instructive and... See more
I ordered this book ten years ago, and decided to read it again. For a reason. It''s a fascinating account of the evolution of the roman empire and its expansion from the Italian peninsual to the rest of the known world
in less then fifty years. The instructive and philosophical pause which Polybius employs as he describes some
of the greatest events and most epic battles in history is enriching and fascinating. As he states from the
outset, his goal is to make his writings "profitable". And they are indeed. I read some reviews and was surprised
to find out, that some parts of the writings were left out. Still, we''re talking five hundred pages. But, it''s an
easy fast read, a page turner, and you will come out on the other side, a wiser person. Lastly, the translation
is in and in itself, a work of art, deserving of praise.
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J. Ott
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
For what it is -- quite excellent
Reviewed in the United States on April 24, 2003
Many other reviewers on this site lament all that has been cut from this translation. The decision, of course, was not entirely up to Penguin. A great portion of Polybius'' work has been lost to the ravages of history. Other surviving portions are quite repetitive. As... See more
Many other reviewers on this site lament all that has been cut from this translation. The decision, of course, was not entirely up to Penguin. A great portion of Polybius'' work has been lost to the ravages of history. Other surviving portions are quite repetitive. As someone with an interest in the history but not a consuming scholarly passion, I found the selections well-chosen and fascinating; the translation readable. What more can you ask?
F.W. Walbank''s long-winded introduction told me much more than I ever needed to know about this second-tier historian. What makes Polybius valuable is that he actually played a part in some of the events he described and seems to have prized first-hand sources, interviewing people involved and consulting contemporary documents, especially in the Roman Senate. As a Greek who had spent time in Rome, he wrote the history primarily for his fellow Greeks, to explain how a nothing civilization (Rome) on the edge of the Hellenistic World rose to power so quickly.
The account of Rome''s Wars with Carthage is very even-handed and compelling. In other passages, his Greek prejudices often show through. Especially when he is talking about rival historians like Timaeus. He devotes a whole chapter, in fact, to insulting Timaeus. The chapter shows you something of Polybius'' character that he would stop his history of the world to engage in academic fisticuffs.
This book functions well as an explanation of Rome to a non-Roman. I learned a great deal about the character of Rome and the Romans as well as all the Hellenistic kingdoms. At 541 pages, no one can accuse this of being a reader''s digest version. The appendix includes nice maps and all the sections are titled so that one can easily flip through and find the portion in the chapter "Affairs in Greece" on "The Character of Philip." I guess what you have to ask yourself is whether you are already an expert on the history of the Mediterranean World from 200 to 146 BCE. If so, you are probably beyond Penguin editions like this one.
64 people found this helpful
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Lance Kirby
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Morsel From the Meal
Reviewed in the United States on October 10, 2000
The Penguin Classics, though an excellent publisher, has made a habit of abridging many major works and not always to their benifit---this is one. Though the abridgments are done to make the classics more "accessable" to the ordinary reader, they at the same time... See more
The Penguin Classics, though an excellent publisher, has made a habit of abridging many major works and not always to their benifit---this is one. Though the abridgments are done to make the classics more "accessable" to the ordinary reader, they at the same time dispense with much crucial information. In the case of this edition they have disposed of large chunks of the narrative leading to a sense of discontinuity from book to book, most importantly the battle of Cynoscephalae and the taking and destruction of Carthage. Other than these few deficiencys a fine introduction to one of the greatest masters of socio-political analysis from the ancient world.
30 people found this helpful
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Luke Liem
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unacceptable - Poor Quality
Reviewed in the United States on September 8, 2013
It is simply unacceptable for this important historical work to be so poorly adapted for Kindle: 1. Significant spelling mistakes - "die" in place of "the" in multiple locations, just as an example. 2. No map - how an the readers read... See more
It is simply unacceptable for this important historical work to be so poorly adapted for Kindle:

1. Significant spelling mistakes - "die" in place of "the" in multiple locations, just as an example.

2. No map - how an the readers read about the Punic Wars without maps of Sicily, Italy, North Africa, etc.

At a price almost the same as the paperback, this is an unacceptable poor quality product!!
One person found this helpful
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qaimeq
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
AN EXCELLENT REASON NEVER TO BUY AN ACADEMIC WORK ON KINDLE
Reviewed in the United States on October 9, 2015
The book was interesting, easy to read and full of useful information. There is one feature that I found annoying, however. Almost every page had at least one referral to footnotes. Try as I might, I never managed to access these footnotes. Finally... See more
The book was interesting, easy to read and full of useful information. There is one feature that I found annoying, however.

Almost every page had at least one referral to footnotes. Try as I might, I never managed to access these footnotes.

Finally I called a customer service tech. We tried various things without success. Finally the tech said, "I guess we have to admit that this edition DOES NOT HAVE ANY FOOTNOTES. What was then my shock when, on finishing the book today, I saw----low and behold---page after page of FOOTNOTES. Interesting as they are to read now, they are hardly as useful and helpful as they would have been, if they had been accessible WHILE I was reading the text instead of divorced entirely from it.

Upshot??? Never again will I buy an academic work on kindle. Half of the information will be unavailable until it is useless.
5 people found this helpful
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John Yancura
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Some good mud slinging to reassure us that the author is human
Reviewed in the United States on January 8, 2011
Rise of the Roman Empire is not really an easy read. Polybus takes himself and his subject matter very seriously and he refuses to let a ray of humor or irony into the work. But, when you think about it, the subject matter is pretty serious, especially considering that... See more
Rise of the Roman Empire is not really an easy read. Polybus takes himself and his subject matter very seriously and he refuses to let a ray of humor or irony into the work. But, when you think about it, the subject matter is pretty serious, especially considering that the author was born around 200 BC in Megalopolis, Arcadia, which at that time was an active member of the Achaean League (or what most of us call ancient Greece). During Polybus'' lifetime, the Romans rose to power over the Greeks and the Carthagians and the author tries to explain how this happened. In fact the name of the book ought to be, "How the Romans Ate Our Lunch and, Damn, They Did a Good Job Doing it!"

Polybus gives two reasons why the Romans rose above their rivals to dominate the world: (1) good governance and (2) organization on and off the battlefield. The author lauds the Romans'' mixed constitution which he cites as a balance between the three forms of acceptable government: monarchy, aristocracy and democracy. I''ve read that this had an effect on the US founding fathers. Polybus writes that the Romans had a good balance between checks and balances and efficiency of decision making.

Another reason for Roman ascension and dominance given by Polybus is the Romans'' ability to focus on a task and to work together to achieve it. This can be said of most great empires and cultures and the inverse can be said of most basket cases. Polybus makes an interesting comment that the Romans were better at land warfare than they were at sea warfare because the Romans could plan and control things better on land. The Romans managed to do OK against Carthage at sea. But, the Romans still did best when they stuck to mother earth.

Also of note, was Polybus'' smack down on the rival historian Timaeus. Polybus spends a lot of ink telling us readers that Timaeus is a schmuck and that Polybus'' rhyme rules. Sure, `Rise of the Roman Empire'' is lacking in humor and irony. However, it provides insight into an important turn in the history or Western civilization that was far from pre-ordained. And we have some good mud slinging to reassure us that the author is human after all.
6 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Kieran
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not edition advertised
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 7, 2019
Translation was 30 years older than this version and very battered, deeply unhappy with misleading photo.
One person found this helpful
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Mrs Amanda Wilkes
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good service
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 12, 2017
For my son''s a-level history, so he''s pleased. Just as described and quick delivery.
One person found this helpful
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Tea Granny
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Genuine Classic
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 23, 2015
Used item, but in excellent condition as described, and great value. A classic Roman history, that will please anyone interested in the subject.
2 people found this helpful
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Mr. Michael LJ Feehan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 1, 2018
As ever top quality delivered on time.
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FrancesJuli
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 14, 2013
Good book for learning more on ancient history. Plus it is an excellent primary source book, for those that are learning about ancient Rome on a course.
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2021 popular The Rise high quality of the Roman outlet sale Empire (Penguin Classics) sale

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